UK companies are falling short of Government targets for women on their board of directors

The UK’s largest firms are set to fall short of the Government’s targets for women on board of directors, according to the latest figures.

In firms in the FTSE 100, 32.1 per cent of the board members are women, which has increased in recent years. In 2018 the figure was 30.2 per cent, and there has been a significant increase since 2011 when just 12.5 per cent of board members at FTSE 100 companies were women.

A review was established to examine the gender gap in the top tier of UK business and has set out Government targets.

The official Government target is for one-third of board members to be women at the 350 largest-listed UK firms by the end of 2020.

However, in the FTSE 250, women make up 27.5 per cent of the board members, according to official figures.

Of the 350 largest-listed UK companies, four firms have an all-male board, which has decreased from 152 in 2011, while more than 40 companies have just one woman on their board.

A review was established to examine the gender gap in the top tier of UK business and has set out these Government targets.

Sir Phillip Hampton, Chair of the review, said: “The FTSE 250 is working hard to catch up but still too many boards have only one woman and remarkably today there are four all-male boards in the FTSE 250.

“We are expecting to see good progress in the number of women appointed into senior leadership roles this year, with those companies having worked hard for several years exceeding the 33 per cent target and reaping the benefits.

“We look forward to receiving the data submissions during the month of July and reporting on progress in November.”

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